Caribbean-On-Line's Caribbean Hurricane Blog








Caribbean & Atlantic Tropical Storms & Hurricanes 2014

Name Start End Tropical Storm Hurricane
Arthur 7/1/2014 7/5/2014
Bertha
Cristobal
Dolly
Edouard
Fay
Gonzalo
Hanna
Isaias
Josephine
Kyle
Laura
Marco
Nana
Omar
Paulette
Rene
Sally
Teddy
Vicky
Wilfred

Current feed from the National Hurricane Center

Recent Comments:

Recent Posts:

Tropical Depression Two

Published on July 21, 2014 10:05 PM | Comments

Not expected to turn into much - but could bring some rain and wind to the islands:

Tropical Depression Two

TROPICAL DEPRESSION TWO DISCUSSION NUMBER 1 NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL AL022014 500 PM AST MON JUL 21 2014

The area of low pressure in the tropical Atlantic has shown an
increase in convective organization today. Despite the fact that the
convection remains somewhat shallow, it has enough coverage and
organization to classify the system as a tropical cyclone. An ASCAT
pass around 1210 UTC was not conclusive in regards to whether the
surface circulation was closed, but given the persistence of the
convection, we are assuming that the circulation is closed and
are initiating advisories at this time.

The initial intensity of 30 kt is based on data from the ASCAT pass.
The environment is marginal, at best, for development during the
next couple of days, as the depression will be moving over marginal
SSTs and into a region characterized by dry air and subsidence as it
approaches the Caribbean Sea. Most of the global model guidance and
the HWRF shows the system weakening and dissipating by 48 to 72
hours. The official forecast follows suit, but the cyclone could
dissipate sooner than shown here. The SHIPS and LGEM intensity
forecasts seem much too high in this scenario, and are not given
much weight in the official forecast.

The initial motion is quickly toward the west or 280/14 knots. The
cyclone will be steered by the Atlantic subtropical ridge during its
life span, and should remain on a westward to west-northwestward
heading with an increase in forward speed. The NHC track forecast is
close to a blend of the HWRF and the GEFS ensemble mean. Note that
the global models are having a difficult time tracking the small
vortex, and confidence in the details of the track forecast is lower
than usual.

FORECAST POSITIONS AND MAX WINDS

INIT 21/2100Z 11.6N 43.8W 30 KT 35 MPH
12H 22/0600Z 11.9N 45.8W 30 KT 35 MPH
24H 22/1800Z 12.3N 48.2W 30 KT 35 MPH
36H 23/0600Z 12.8N 51.0W 30 KT 35 MPH
48H 23/1800Z 13.4N 54.2W 30 KT 35 MPH
72H 24/1800Z 15.0N 61.0W 30 KT 35 MPH...POST-TROP/REMNT LOW
96H 25/1800Z...DISSIPATED



Experimental 5-Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook

Published on July 13, 2014 12:19 PM | Comments

The new 5 day graphic explained by the NHC:



Arthur now a hurricane

Published on July 3, 2014 8:53 AM | Comments

Arthur has become a hurricane - the first of the season. It is no threat to the Caribbean.

HURRICANE ARTHUR DISCUSSION NUMBER 10 NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL AL012014 500 AM EDT THU JUL 03 2014

Data from NOAA and Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter aircraft
indicate that Arthur has reached hurricane strength. Both aircraft
showed several SFMR winds of 60 to 63 kt southeast of the center,
and the NOAA aircraft reported a peak flight-level wind of 79 kt at
8,000 feet. Based on these data the initial intensity is set to 65
kt. Radar data show that Arthur was still having difficulty
maintaining an eyewall overnight, likely due to dry mid/upper-level
air being entrained into the storm. However, the overall radar
presentation has improved during the past couple of hours. Some
gradual intensification is forecast during the next 24 hours while
the cyclone is in an environment of low shear and moves over warm
waters. After that time, however, the shear increases dramatically
as Arthur interacts with a deep-layer baroclinic zone moving off
of the east coast of North America, and global model fields show
Arthur completing extratropical transition by 72 hours. The NHC
intensity forecast is similar to the previous one and remains close
to the multi-model consensus IVCN through 24 hours and is a little
below the consensus after that time.

Radar data and aircraft fixes indicate that the current motion is
now a little east of due north, or 010 degrees at 8 knots. Arthur
should begin to recurve today ahead of the aforementioned deep-layer
trough, and the track model guidance is in good agreement on this
scenario. The NHC track forecast is similar to the previous one and
remains near the middle of the dynamical model envelope and close
to the TVCA multi-model consensus. The official forecast shows the
center of Arthur moving very close to the North Carolina Outer Banks
late tonight and early Friday. Arthur should then accelerate
northeastward offshore of the mid-Atlantic states and the
northeastern U.S. Friday and Friday night, and move into the
Canadian Maritimes by Saturday before turning northward by the end
of the period.

The track, intensity, and wind radii forecast during the
extratropical phase of Arthur have been coordinated with the Ocean
Prediction Center.

The new experimental potential storm surge flooding map is
available at: www.nhc.noaa.gov/graphics_at1.shtml?inundation

FORECAST POSITIONS AND MAX WINDS

INIT 03/0900Z 31.3N 79.1W 65 KT 75 MPH
12H 03/1800Z 32.5N 78.3W 70 KT 80 MPH
24H 04/0600Z 34.7N 76.1W 75 KT 85 MPH
36H 04/1800Z 37.5N 72.6W 75 KT 85 MPH
48H 05/0600Z 40.9N 67.9W 70 KT 80 MPH
72H 06/0600Z 47.5N 60.0W 50 KT 60 MPH...POST-TROP/EXTRATROP
96H 07/0600Z 54.0N 52.0W 35 KT 40 MPH...POST-TROP/EXTRATROP
120H 08/0600Z 60.0N 50.0W 35 KT 40 MPH...POST-TROP/EXTRATROP



TROPICAL STORM ARTHUR DISCUSSION NUMBER 6

Published on July 2, 2014 9:57 AM | Comments

TROPICAL STORM ARTHUR DISCUSSION NUMBER 6
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL AL012014
500 AM EDT WED JUL 02 2014

Despite a somewhat ragged appearance on satellite imagery, Arthur
has strengthened overnight. Data from two ASCAT passes between 02
and 03 UTC showed a broad area of 45-50 kt winds east and northeast
of the center. In addition, NOAA and Air Force Reserve Hurricane
Hunter aircraft have found surface winds in the 45-50 kt range to
the south and northeast of the center, while also finding the
central pressure has fallen to about 996 mb. Based on all of
these data, the initial intensity is set to 50 kt.

Arthur is still suffering the effects of dry air aloft being
entrained into the western half of the circulation, which
features only limited cold cloud tops. The primary convective band
is situated east and southeast of the center, and some semblance of
an eye has been visible in satellite and radar imagery and was
reported by the aircraft. This lopsided structure suggests that
Arthur will not strengthen quickly in the short term. However, given
an otherwise favorable environment of warm water and weak wind
shear, all of the intensity guidance shows the cyclone becoming a
hurricane in 24 to 36 hours, and so does the official forecast. By
72 hours, Arthur will be moving into a high shear environment ahead
of an advancing mid/upper-level trough, which should result in
weakening during the extratropical transition process. The NHC
intensity forecast is close to the intensity consensus aid IVCN
through the period.

Arthur has begun moving steadily northward at around 5 kt. The
overall track forecast reasoning remains unchanged, as the tropical
cyclone should continue northward for the next 12 to 24 hours
and then gradually accelerate northeastward between the
aforementioned trough and a strengthening ridge to the east. The
track guidance envelope has shifted back to the west a little for
this cycle, and the NHC forecast has been adjusted in that
direction, but now lies on the eastern edge of the guidance
envelope through 48 hours.

Given the new NHC forecast, hurricane and tropical storm watches
have been issued for portions of the coasts of South and North
Carolina. Warnings may be required for portions of these areas
later today.



Tropical Storm Arthur

Published on July 1, 2014 2:45 PM | Comments

This is predicted to be a fast moving storm - and it is the first named storm of the 2014 Atlantic season:

TROPICAL STORM ARTHUR DISCUSSION NUMBER 3 NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL AL012014 1100 AM EDT TUE JUL 01 2014

Radar and satellite imagery indicate that the convective
organization of the cyclone has improved since the previous
advisory, and the cyclone is being upgraded based on a sustained
wind report of 33 kt from Settlement Point (SPGF1) on Grand Bahama
Island earlier this morning that was outside of the deep convection.

After remaining nearly stationary earlier this morning, Arthur
appears to to be drifting northwestward now with an uncertain motion
of 315/02 kt. Otherwise, there is no significant change to the
previous forecast track. The latest model guidance has continued the
trend of a pronounced mid-tropospheric trough digging southeastward
from the upper-midwest into the northeastern and mid-Atlantic region
of the United States by 72 hours. The 500 mb flow pattern is almost
identical in the GFS and ECMWF models, which increases the
confidence in this evolving pattern. As a result, a steady increase
in southwesterly steering flow over the southeastern United States
is expected to gradually turn the tropical cyclone northward over
the next 24-36 hours, and then accelerate the system faster toward
the northeast on Thursday and Friday. By Days 4 and 5, Arthur is
forecast to move over the far north Atlantic as an extratropical
cyclone. The NHC track forecast is just an update of the previous
advisory track, and lies down the middle of the tightly packed
guidance envelope close to the consensus model TVCA.

Northwesterly vertical wind shear is forecast by the models to
gradually subside over the next 48 hours, which should allow the
cyclone to develop its own upper-level outflow pattern. In fact,
latest visible and water vapor imagery indicates that cirrus
outflow has been expanding on the north side of the system during
the past few hours, suggesting that the shear conditions could
already be subsiding. The low shear conditions and warm
sea-surface temperatures should allow for at least steady
strengthening, and the cyclone is expected to become a hurricane by
72 hours. The official intensity forecast is similar to the
latest intensity model consensus IVCN through 36 hours, and then
slightly higher after that.




TD One off the coast of Florida

Published on July 1, 2014 9:10 AM | Comments

June came and went quietly, July 1 brings the first Tropical Depression of the year. Not a Caribbean threat, but it could become a hurricane on the U.S. East Coast:

000 WTNT31 KNHC 011153 TCPAT1

BULLETIN
TROPICAL DEPRESSION ONE INTERMEDIATE ADVISORY NUMBER 2A
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL AL012014
800 AM EDT TUE JUL 01 2014

...DEPRESSION STATIONARY OFFSHORE OF THE COAST OF CENTRAL
FLORIDA...


SUMMARY OF 800 AM EDT...1200 UTC...INFORMATION
----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...27.5N 79.2W
ABOUT 95 MI...155 KM SE OF CAPE CANAVERAL FLORIDA
ABOUT 215 MI...345 KM NNW OF THE NORTHWESTERN BAHAMAS
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...35 MPH...55 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT...STATIONARY
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...1007 MB...29.74 INCHES


WATCHES AND WARNINGS
--------------------
CHANGES WITH THIS ADVISORY...

NONE.

SUMMARY OF WATCHES AND WARNINGS IN EFFECT...

A TROPICAL STORM WATCH IS IN EFFECT FOR...
* EAST COAST OF FLORIDA FROM FORT PIERCE TO FLAGLER BEACH

A TROPICAL STORM WATCH MEANS THAT TROPICAL STORM CONDITIONS ARE
POSSIBLE WITHIN THE WATCH AREA...IN THIS CASE WITHIN 24 TO 36 HOURS.

INTERESTS ELSEWHERE ALONG THE SOUTHEAST COAST OF THE UNITED STATES
SHOULD MONITOR THE PROGRESS OF THIS SYSTEM.

FOR STORM INFORMATION SPECIFIC TO YOUR AREA IN THE UNITED STATES...
INCLUDING POSSIBLE INLAND WATCHES AND WARNINGS...PLEASE MONITOR
PRODUCTS ISSUED BY YOUR LOCAL NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FORECAST
OFFICE. FOR INFORMATION SPECIFIC TO YOUR AREA OUTSIDE OF THE UNITED
STATES...PLEASE MONITOR PRODUCTS ISSUED BY YOUR NATIONAL
METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE.


DISCUSSION AND 48-HOUR OUTLOOK
------------------------------
AT 800 AM EDT...1200 UTC...THE CENTER OF TROPICAL DEPRESSION ONE
WAS LOCATED NEAR LATITUDE 27.5 NORTH...LONGITUDE 79.2 WEST. THE
DEPRESSION HAS REMAINED NEARLY STATIONARY DURING THE PAST FEW HOURS.
A NORTHWESTWARD MOTION IS EXPECTED TO BEGIN LATER TODAY...FOLLOWED
BY A TURN TOWARD THE NORTH ON WEDNESDAY. ON THE FORECAST TRACK...THE
CENTER OF THE TROPICAL CYCLONE IS EXPECTED TO REMAIN JUST OFFSHORE
AND MOVE EAST OF THE EAST-CENTRAL COAST OF FLORIDA DURING THE NEXT
DAY OR SO. THE SYSTEM IS FORECAST TO PASS EAST OF NORTHEASTERN
FLORIDA ON WEDNESDAY AND WEDNESDAY NIGHT.

MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS ARE NEAR 35 MPH...55 KM/H...WITH HIGHER
GUSTS. SOME STRENGTHENING IS FORECAST DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS...
AND THE DEPRESSION IS EXPECTED TO BECOME A TROPICAL STORM LATER
TODAY. DURING THE PAST FEW HOURS...SETTLEMENT POINT OBSERVATION SITE
ON GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND REPORTED SUSTAINED WINDS OF 37 MPH...59 KM/H
WITH GUSTS TO 43 MPH...69 KM/H.

THE ESTIMATED MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE IS 1007 MB...29.74 INCHES.



TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK 800 AM EDT SUN JUN 1 2014

Published on June 1, 2014 10:40 AM | Comments

6.1.14.gif

TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL 800 AM EDT SUN JUN 1 2014

For the North Atlantic...Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico:

1. An elongated and nearly stationary area of low pressure located over the Bay of Campeche extends northeastward into the south-central Gulf of Mexico. Although shower activity is currently disorganized, some slow development of this disturbance is possible this week as environmental conditions become marginally conducive. * Formation chance through 48 hours...low...near 0 percent * Formation chance through 5 days...low...20 percent

Today marks the first day of the Atlantic hurricane season, which will run until November 30. Long-term averages for the number of named storms, hurricanes, and major hurricanes are 12, 6, and 3, respectively.

The list of names for 2014 is as follows:

Name Pronunciation
Arthur AR-thur
Laura LOOR-ruh
Bertha BUR-thuh
Marco MAR-koe
Cristobal krees-TOH-bahl
Nana NA-na
Dolly DAH-lee
Omar OH-mar
Edouard eh-DWARD
Paulette pawl-LET
Fay fay
Rene re-NAY
Gonzalo gohn-SAH-loh
Sally SAL-ee
Hanna HAN-uh
Teddy TEHD-ee
Isaias ees-ah-EE-ahs
Vicky VIH-kee
Josephine JOH-seh-feen
Wilfred WILL-fred
Kyle KY-ull

This product, the Tropical Weather Outlook, briefly describes significant areas of disturbed weather and their potential for tropical cyclone formation during the next 48 hours. The issuance times of this product are 2 AM, 8 AM, 2 AM, and 8 PM EDT. After the change to standard time in November, the issuance times are 1 AM, 7 AM, 1 PM, and 7 PM EST.

A Special Tropical Weather Outlook will be issued to provide updates, as necessary, in between the regularly scheduled issuances of the Tropical Weather Outlook. Special Tropical Weather Outlooks will be issued under the same WMO and AWIPS headers as the regular Tropical Weather Outlooks.

A standard package of products, consisting of the Tropical Cyclone Public Advisory, the Forecast/Advisory, the Tropical Cyclone Discussion, and the Wind Speed Probabilities, is issued every six hours for all ongoing tropical cyclones. In addition, a Special Advisory package may be issued at any time to advise of significant unexpected changes or to modify watches or warnings.

The Tropical Cyclone Update is a brief statement to inform of significant changes in a tropical cyclone or to post or cancel watches or warnings. It is used in lieu of or to precede the issuance of a special advisory package. The Tropical Cyclone Update is also used to provide a continuous flow of information regarding the center location of a tropical cyclone when watches or warnings are in effect and the center can be easily tracked with land-based radar. Tropical Cyclone Updates, which can be issued at any time, can be found under WMO header WTNT61-65 KNHC, and under AWIPS header MIATCUAT1-5.

All National Hurricane Center text and graphical products are available on the web at http://www.hurricanes.gov. You can also interact with NHC on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/NWSNHC. Notifications are available via Twitter when select National Hurricane Center products are issued. Information about our Atlantic Twitter feed is available at http://www.hurricanes.gov/twitter.php.



Latest Public Advisory

Published on May 31, 2014 10:51 PM | Comments



Caribbean Hurricane Season 2014

Published on May 31, 2014 10:26 PM | Comments

Tomorrow kicks off the 2014 Hurricane Season. We have completely updated the website this year, which will mark our 10th year of covering storms here on Caribbean-On-Line. The site is now mobile friendly and should be much more easy to navigate and use on your phone and tablet.

Please see our new re-design of the Hurricane Blog, and remember that you can unsubscribe from these emails at any time by visiting the home page and using the small form in the left hand navigation (from a computer web browser only - you won't see that option on mobile devices at the moment!).

Last season was particularly quiet after a lot of bold predictions - we'll hope for the same in 2014! Wishing peace and safety to all of our friends in the Caribbean.



Tropical Discussion

Published on May 31, 2014 10:22 PM | Comments



Infrared Caribbean Satellite

Published on May 31, 2014 6:30 PM | Comments



Tropical Weather Websites and Resources

Published on May 31, 2014 3:53 PM | Comments


From the Global Hydrology & Climate Center (NASA - these images can be animated):

From the NOAA: (the following links open in pop up windows)

  • Comprehensive page of Atlantic and Caribbean Tropical Satellite Imagery here


From The NHC:

From The U.S. Navy:

From Accuweather:


  • Hurricane Center Good map for tracking of the whole Atlantic including Africa, so you can see the tropical waves come all the way across the ocean.

From Intellicast:

From The Weather Channel:



All quiet in the Caribbean

Published on October 18, 2013 7:58 AM | Comments

With no major Caribbean storms since Gabrielle over a month ago, the Caribbean basin remains quiet and the National Hurricane Center predicts that to remain the situation for the next several days. Overall the season has been much tamer than originally forecast, and the central Caribbean area has seen less named storms than the Gulf of Mexico. A strange season for sure, but certainly welcome. The less hurricanes, the better for everyone.

There is not much left to the season but we will be watching - safe travels!



Tropical Weather Update

Published on September 11, 2013 11:06 AM | Comments

There is a lot going on out there, but nothing immediately threatening the Caribbean, which is our focus here. The worst news is that Gabrielle is a Tropical Storm again and is currently over Bermuda. There are several other systems, including Hurricane Humberto, which is way out in the Atlantic and does not appear to be any threat to the Caribbean.

Things seem to be heating up a bit and we are in the heart of the season, which the experts have recently downgraded. We'll be watching closely in the coming weeks.



Tropical Storm Gabrielle lashes Puerto Rico with heavy rains

Published on September 5, 2013 12:37 PM | Comments

Well the mess of weather in the Caribbean basin has turned into Tropical Storm Gabrielle. I don't know about other people but I am having a hard time getting to the NHC website to read the latest discussion, etc.

This is from NBC news:

MIAMI -- Tropical Storm Gabrielle brought heavy rains to Puerto Rico and neighboring islands Thursday, according to the National Hurricane Center.

It had maximum sustained winds of 40 mph as it moved northwest at 8 mph, according to a 5 a.m. ET update that had the storm about 40 miles south-southwest of Ponce, Puerto Rico.

Although it was expected to strengthen slowly through the weekend, experts said it had little chance of growing into the season's first hurricane.

We will be posting more ASAP. The ECMWF does not show anything on their maps so I guess this is not forecast to be a major storm, but obviously it is a lot of rain for the islands in the path.